Typecrafters

Posts tagged reflections

0 notes &

The End of Summer

As the summer of 2012 comes to an end, I wax nostalgic.  This summer began with a trip to Europe with my family of 5—two daughters, a son-in-law, and my husband of 30 years.  We celebrated our 30th anniversary, one daughter’s 21’s birthday, and the other daughter’s 2nd wedding anniversary.  Just before leaving on my trip, I embarked on the first three classes of summer school, aka graduate school. 

Traveling while learning how to manipulate the online curriculum of grad school, and then trying to find internet coverage to submit virtual papers on time proved to be a bit tricky, but I was able to sleep at night, knowing that the family was having a good time, and that I was keeping up with my challenging assignments.

When I returned home, I began to get better acquainted with my fellow students—many of whom I will never actually meet.  We bonded over tough assignments, discussed pets and problems, held each other up during tough times such as the loss of loved ones, or the shared experiences of being members of the sandwich generation.

As I turned in my last paper today, I realize that I will miss these virtual friends and while we vow to stay in touch, I am realistic enough to know that some relationships will not stand the test of time. 

It has been a good summer, I have learned a lot about myself and hopefully, have helped others along the way.

Filed under nostalgia travels leeds castle grad school end of summer Library reflections travel reading writing Library Science MLS

115 notes &

This has been reposted from the NYPL and Smithsonian Magazine web sites.

The Deerstalker: Where Sherlock Holmes’ Popular Image Came From, via Smithsonian Magazine.
An interesting read, and a similar theme to an upcoming exhibition at NYPL, which will focus on how Dickens’ characters have been portrayed visually over the years.
** Edited to add: We see there’s been some confusion about this post. We know that Dickens didn’t write the Sherlock Holmes books — what we meant to say was that our exhibition, like this article, focuses on how illustrators have portrayed fictional characters over the years. The article refers to Sherlock Holmes, while our exhibition will focus on the characters of Dickens. Hope that clears things up!

This has been reposted from the NYPL and Smithsonian Magazine web sites.

The Deerstalker: Where Sherlock Holmes’ Popular Image Came From, via Smithsonian Magazine.

An interesting read, and a similar theme to an upcoming exhibition at NYPL, which will focus on how Dickens’ characters have been portrayed visually over the years.

** Edited to add: We see there’s been some confusion about this post. We know that Dickens didn’t write the Sherlock Holmes books — what we meant to say was that our exhibition, like this article, focuses on how illustrators have portrayed fictional characters over the years. The article refers to Sherlock Holmes, while our exhibition will focus on the characters of Dickens. Hope that clears things up!

(Source: nypl)

Filed under Library reflections travel reading writing Library Science MLS

12 notes &

NYPL Archives Research Fellowships

nypl:

NYPL is currently digitizing the papers of Samuel J. Tilden. In conjunction with this important archival resource, NYPL is offering researchfellowships of up to $5,000 to support research projects related to Tilden’s circle of activity and the political culture in New York and the United States during the 19th century. 

The application deadline is September 1! Learn More

Filed under Library reflections travel reading writing Library Science MLS

Follow Me on Pinterest